Grace MX II Trail Mid-Drive Electric Bike

The Grace MX II Trail is a cross-country-style electric hard tail with great hardware, good looks, and a top-of-the-line drive system from Bosch. To date, this is one of the most affordable Bosch-powered electric bikes I’ve tested, coming in at around $3,700. It’s available in two sizes for an improved fit and comes with front and rear LED lights that are very well done (powered by the original battery, mounted outside the cockpit and seat post).

Grace MX II Trail Mid-Drive Electric Bike

The only questionable aspects of this bike are the smaller 26″ vs. 27.5″ or 29er wheels, which should provide better traction and better spreading surface contact over bumps and cracks that may be encountered. They meet on the way Still, 26″ wheels are known to be drivable and tires and tubes are less expensive to replace as they are the dominant standard.

The motor that powers the Grace MX II Trail is a second-generation Bosch mid-drive that offers 350 watts of power. It is low, centralized, and very durable (zero maintenance program). And while it’s not the quietest engine, it’s not the loudest, and it’s smart enough to shut itself off whenever you pull the brake lever or change gears.

This thing senses pedaling torque, pedaling speed, and bike speed for near-instant start and stop, which is important in some off-road environments. It only offers pedal assist (no throttle mode), but it’s very efficient with a minimum range of 50+ miles, even on bikes like this with knobby treads.

The Grace MX II Trail’s motors and lights are powered by a standard Bosch Powerpack 400 battery that provides 36 volts of power and 11 amp-hours of capacity. It’s sleek, relatively light, can be loaded on or off the frame, and uses an integrated lock that’s pretty secure (ABUS-made lock core).

The cells inside the battery pack are 18650 sizes with lithium manganese cobalt chemistry which is lightweight and durable for over 1,000 charge cycles. Because of the mounting points on this package, there’s unfortunately not much room for a water bottle cage on the down tube or seat tube, but the seat post is pretty open (thanks to the low profile of the rear LED light)) and you can opt for that too. For Camelback or other backpack-style hydration systems.

I like the cockpit and handlebar setup on the Grace MX II because it’s super clean but still very functional. The grips have locks so they don’t rotate when you really push, the shift triggers are clean and out of the way, and the LCD panel and associated button panel work like any Bosch system…they’re big, easy to use, and hand-free from the grip. Removed and easily accessible.

The display panel is removable (there’s a set screw so you can keep it more permanently on the bike or not) and is backlit for nighttime use. As mentioned above, there are LED lights that are powered by the original battery and activated via the Bosch system. I like that the headlight sits on the fork of the head tube but doesn’t mount directly to the handlebar. It is very well positioned to be effective but also to avoid harm and confusion.

This bike is exciting to me because it brings the best technology to a more affordable platform that still looks amazing. 2015 is the first year that Grace bikes will be officially distributed in the US, and while not many shops will carry them right now, I’m sure that will change over time. The Grace MX II is my favorite in the trail lineup because I like the suspension and the occasional off-road ride, but I mostly ride e-bikes for commuting.

With a lockout fork, the bike can ride almost as efficiently as a city-oriented ebike (reduced) and the ebike is very functional due to its light, balanced weight and easy access to the wheel for leveling and changing flats. I would recommend it for many types of riding and as a good upgrade or the first premium electric bike that will last.

Why We Love It – Grace MX II

The Grace MX II Trail is a cross-country style electric hard tail with great hardware, good looks, and a top-of-the-line drive system from Bosch. It’s one of the more affordable Bosch-powered electric bikes, even though the Amazon page is double the price. It is available in two sizes for a better fit and comes with front and rear LED lights which are very well done while running on the main battery.

The only questionable aspects of this bike are the smaller 26″ vs. 27.5″ or 29er wheels, which should provide better traction and better surface contact over bumps and cracks that may be encountered. 27.5 It became more prominent. Still, 26″ wheels are known to be maneuverable, and MTB tires and tubes are the dominant standards and less expensive to replace.

Pros:

  • One of the most affordable electric bikes with a Bosch Gen2 center drive motor
  • Sleek aesthetics, clean lines, integrated cables, and a clean, minimalist logo make this e-bike look professional.
  • The front suspension has a lockout, so this bike can ride more efficiently on rough terrain or as an urban commuter.
  • High-end capable components that can withstand cross-country and light trail use
  • Mid-drive system is efficient for climbing, highly durable, and makes tire changes, puncture repairs, and wheel adjustments easy.
  • The Pedalec system is highly sensitive (measures pedaling torque, cadence, and bike speed) and shuts off quickly, which is important when riding off-road.
  • Integrated LED lights run on the main battery and are carefully placed in a protected location (the front light does not clutter the cockpit/handlebar area and the rear light is under the saddle).
  • Ergon’s high-quality saddle offers improved riding ergonomics and looks great too
  • Double leg kickstand stores neatly to the side but provides great stability when parked, ideal for commuting
  • Hydraulic disc brakes provide the excellent stopping power and reduce hand fatigue in off-road environments.
  • Excellent weight distribution offers improved balance with the motor and battery pack located in the lower center of the frame
  • Rack and fender mounting points included on rear seat straps for added utility and customization

Cons:

  • At the time of this review, the distribution of Grace e-bikes in the United States was limited, which may make it more difficult to find and test the bike in person or to receive future service support.
  • There is no throttle mode available, it’s just a pedelec and requires pedaling input from the rider to activate the motor
  • There is no room for a water bottle cage on the down tube or seat tube due to the mid-mounted battery pack

Durability and Build Quality – Grace MX II

The grips have locks so they don’t rotate when you really push, the shift triggers are clean and out of the way and the LCD panel and associated button panels work like any Bosch system, they’re big, easy to use, and most importantly, take your hands off the grips. Easy to reach without. The display panel is removable and backlit for night use.

As mentioned, there are also LED lights that are powered by the original battery and activated via the Bosch system. Customer feedback likes that the headlight sits above the head tube’s suspension fork, but doesn’t mount directly to the handlebars, in a great position to be useful but also to prevent damage and distraction. Another bike with a similar build is the Giant Revolt E Pro.

Performance (Speed and Acceleration) – Grace MX II

Powering the Grace MX II motor is a second-generation Bosch mid-drive offering 350 watts of power. While it’s not the quietest motor out there, it’s not as loud as you might find on new or older bikes. With the performance expected from Bosch, it’s a pretty smooth ride, similar to Bulls Ebikes. However, if you need a faster model at 60 mph, you’ll want to read our HalloMotor 5000W FC-1 review.

Range and Battery – Grace MX II

The Grace MX II’s motors and lights are powered by a standard 36-volt Bosch Powerpack battery that provides 11 amp-hours of power. It’s sleek, relatively lightweight, can be carried inside or outside the frame, and uses an integrated lock that’s pretty secure.

Given the mounting points on this pack, there isn’t much room for a water bottle cage on the down tube or seat tube, unfortunately, but the seat post is pretty open and you can opt for a CamelBuck or other type of backpack. Hydration system too. However, if you want a bike that can go 75 miles on a single charge and packs a smart charger, you’ll want to check out the Giant Road E-1 Pro.

Security Features – Grace MX II

It’s smart enough to stop the motor whenever you pull the brake lever or change gears. This thing senses pedaling torque, pedaling speed, and bike speed for near-instant start and stop, which is important in some off-road environments. It only offers pedal assist, but it’s very efficient with a minimum range of 50+ miles, even on bikes like this with knobby treads.

If you face any problem with the frame, fork, wheels, tires, or even battery, customer service is available to help you with any e-bike-related queries through their email address. Email within business days. For brake-related safety features, you’ll want to check out the Haibike Xduro.

Value – Grace MX II

The Grace MX II Trail e-bike is obviously an electric mountain bike, although it costs a lot on Amazon and if you do a little research online it can be found considerably cheaper, and the bike can be found cheaper than the Trek Verve+.

Wrap Up – Grace MX II

While the Grace MX II is a good bike by most reviews, the high price on Amazon and the inability to carry water on the bike are the bike’s biggest issues, some find the bike’s many safety features lacking.

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